Rose Ice Cream


August 8, 2018

This rose ice cream can be made in your high-speed blender in 5 minutes. This berry nice cream is raw, vegan, gluten-free, and paleo-friendly, and is super delicious.

Rose Ice Cream

This rose ice cream is my new obsession. It is so easy and delicious, and takes less than 10 minutes to make in your blender. This rose ice cream is raw, vegan, gluten-free, and paleo-friendly, and you don’t need to churn it. This nice cream can be enjoyed straight out of the blender like a frozen yogurt or transferred to a steel loaf tin and chilled in the freezer for about 4 hours for a harder more traditional ice-cream consistency.

Making instant ice cream in your high-speed blender with frozen fruit (or nice cream as it is commonly referred to) is so easy and is much healthier than most traditional ice cream that is typically sweetened with cane sugar, and contains thickeners, stabilizers, additives, and preservatives.

This rose ice cream recipe just contains almond or cashew milk, frozen strawberries, frozen bananas, cashews, dates, vanilla extract, rose water, and salt. These are all pure ingredients, and with the exception of the rose water, can all be found at a regular grocery store.

For those of you who haven’t used rose water before, it is an incredible ingredient that can be found at Middle Eastern grocers, health food stores, or from online retailers like Amazon.

Rose water is a liquid flavor enhancer that is made by distilling roses and water. Rose water is widely used in Middle Eastern and Asian dishes, and pairs beautifully with strawberries.

Be sure to use 100% pure rose water. Some brands are blends of rose water and natural flavoring, and some rose water on the market is actually rose syrup which is full of sugar, and contains artificial colors and flavors.

Rose water adds an exquisite flavor to recipes, and you can add it to milks, drinks, desserts, cakes, cookies, muffins, and other desserts. It is also fantastic in natural skincare.

Those of you who follow me on instagram would be aware of my strawberry rose almond milk obsession. I literally cannot stop drinking it. The recipe became so popular on my instagram that I posted a longer video on The Blendaholic show page, and after that, I received hundreds of emails asking for a rose ice cream recipe.

Many of you asked me whether you could freeze the strawberry rose almond milk into ice cream. You can put the milk in an ice cream maker and churn it. But, it isn’t as creamy as it could be.

So, I’ve created this rose ice cream recipe riffing off of the flavor of the strawberry rose almond milk. I tried one version with just frozen strawberries, milk, and dates, and it had a nice flavor. but the consistency wasn’t creamy enough for my liking.

Then I tried a version using frozen bananas. But, the color wasn’t appealing, and I always find nice cream recipes using just frozen bananas have a slimy consistency that I don’t like.

I hit the sweet spot with this blend of frozen strawberries and frozen bananas mixed with cashews. The color is gorgeous, the flavor is beautifully balanced, and the mix of milk, cashews, and frozen fruit makes this ice cream super creamy.

For those of you with nut allergies, use boxed coconut milk and omit the cashews. Your ice cream won’t be as creamy, but it will still be delicious.

Many of you have been writing to me on The Blendaholic show page on various video posts asking me what blender I use.

I use the KitchenAid® Pro Line® Series blender – their high-speed blender, which is now the most powerful blender on the market, and certainly the best blender I have ever used. I own almost every blender available (true!) and this blender is the best high-speed blender you can get.

One of my favorite features of the KitchenAid® Pro Line® Series blender is the tamper with the flex edge spatula attached. When you’re making ice cream the spatula allows you to scrape down the sides of the container and at the same time, burst air pockets that form when you’re blending the frozen fruit, and helps you evenly distribute the fruit through the blades for the most even blend so you can completely control the texture of the ice cream to get it juuuust right.

Learn more about the KitchenAid® Pro Line® Series blender.

But, back to this rose cream! Do not miss making it. It is just so good. Leave a comment below and let me know what you think.

*I am a paid ambassador for KitchenAid® blenders. But, my opinions are my own.

THE BLENDAHOLIC SHOW TRAILER

THE BLENDAHOLIC SHOW TRAILER: Hi, my name is Tess and I'm a Blendaholic. Every Monday I share super easy recipes you can make in your blender! I'm blending up smoothies, cocktails, soups, appetizers, snacks, main meals, and desserts. There isn’t anything I won’t try in a blender, and all of the recipes are mind-blowingly delicious. So, dust off your blender, and tune in to The Blendaholic every Monday at 7AM PST to find your perfect blend. Find more easy healthy recipes at The Blender Girlhttps://www.theblendergirl.com/

Posted by The Blendaholic on Monday, January 22, 2018
  • Want to make amazing green smoothies?

    Give me the free tips!

 

Rose Ice Cream

This rose ice cream can be made in your high-speed blender in 5 minutes. This berry nice cream is raw, vegan, gluten-free, and paleo-friendly, and is super delicious.
Prep Time 10 minutes
Total Time 10 minutes
Servings 4 people
Author Tess Masters

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Throw the milk, cashews, dates, rosewater, vanilla and salt into your KitchenAid® Pro Line® Series blender, and blast on high for 30 to 60 seconds, until the ingredients are completely pulverized, and the mixture is smooth.
  2. Scrape down the sides of the blender container. Add the frozen bananas and strawberries, secure the lid, remove the center lid cap, and insert the tamper.
  3. Holding the tamper in place with a firm grip, process on high for 20 to 30 seconds, using the tamper to guide the fruit through the blades until smooth, but still frozen.
  4. Scoop out, and serve immediately like a frozen yogurt, or chill in the freezer for about 4 hours to firm up for a harder sorbet consistency. Do not freeze for much longer or ice crystals will develop.

Recipe Notes

Photo by Trent Lanz; styling by Alicia Buszczak

Comments